Policy and procedure on the Flying of the Union Flag at Council Buildings - Equality Screening

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S75 Equality And Good Relations Screening Form

 

General Information 
Service/
Function
Policy/
Procedure
Project
Strategy
Plan
Guidance
Is this an existing, revised or a new function, service, policy, procedure, project, strategy, plan or guidance?
Existing   ☐         Revised   ☐       New   ☒
Operational Area Corporate Services
Title Policy and procedure on the Flying of the Union Flag at Council Buildings
Brief Summary 
Council ratified a Notice of Motion at the meeting on 1st June 2021 proposing a revised policy and procedure to fly the Union flag on Council buildings, 365 days per year subject to consultation. This motion was later adopted by Council on 5th October 2021.
The buildings identified were:  
• Coleraine Town Hall, 
• Cloonavin Council Headquarters, 
• Limavady Office (Connell St), 
• Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre,
• Ballymoney Town Hall, 
• Riada House, 
• Portrush Town Hall, and 
• Portstewart Town Hall. 
However the list of buildings will be reviewed on an ongoing basis.
What is it trying to achieve? (intended aims and outcomes)
The Notice of Motion aimed to align Council with “the new guidance published by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport to have the Union flag flown on Council and Civic buildings every day (365 days)” . With the outcome of: 
  • embodying “the emblems of the constituent nations united under one Sovereign – the Kingdoms of England and Wales, of Scotland and of Northern Ireland”;
  • providing clarity and enabling decisions on the flying of flags at the designated buildings and 
  • defining a process for designating other buildings.
Who owns and who implements each element of the function, service, policy, procedure, project, strategy, plan or guidance?
This is an organisation wide policy for both staff and service users.
Senior Leadership Team - overall coordination.
Head of Performance - roll-out across Council.
General Manager - Facilities Heads of Service - implementation in the specified Council Buildings.
Building Caretakers – policy application.

Other policies etc. which have a bearing on this function, service, policy, procedure, project, strategy, plan or guidance?

Legislation:
Northern Ireland Act 1998 (Section 75)

Strategies: 
Equality Scheme (renewed 2020)
Equality Action Plan (2019-2023)
Good Relations Strategy
Every Customer Counts Policy
Local Government Code of Conduct
“Together building a United Community” Strategy May 2013
Complaints Policy
Destination Management Strategy 2015-2020
Economic Development Strategy
Corporate Strategy 2020-2024
Dignity & Respect at work policy
Land & Property Policy

Studies, Publications, Statistics and Guidance:
Northern Ireland Statistics & Research Agency – Census 2011
NINIS, Census 2011 
NI Life and Times Survey 2020
Examples from other Councils in Northern Ireland
 

Available Evidence
Evidence to help inform the screening process may take many forms.  Public authorities should ensure that their screening decision is informed by relevant data.
What evidence/information (both qualitative and quantitative have you gathered to inform this function, service, policy, procedure, project, strategy, plan or guidance?  Specify details for relevant Section 75 categories.

It is proposed that all Section 75 categories will be considered via:

  • Quantitative evidence has been sourced via the NI Census in 2011 and the Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey 2020.  
     
  • Review of other Council policies demonstrated a range of policies / practices regarding the flying of the Union flag.  These range from the flying of no flags at all to flying the Union flag on the basis of the principles in the Flag Flying Regulations to flying the Union flag on a permanent basis at Council buildings.
     
  • There have been no complaints regarding the current arrangements for flying the union flag during the lifespan of Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council.
     
  • The motion was followed by call in notice which expressed an objection to the motion under Section 41(1)(b) (disproportionate adverse-affect) of the 2014 Local Government Act:
    ‘Some inhabitants of our Council area, those who use, visit and work in the council buildings are adversely impacted by this motion and may be made to feel uncomfortable, unrepresented and deterred from using public buildings as a result of this motion’.
     
  • The Flags (Northern Ireland) Order 2000  and the Flags Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2000 set out the specified days for flying the Union Flag at government buildings and courthouses in Northern Ireland.  However Council Offices are not included in Schedule 1 of the Flags Order which list the specified government buildings covered by the Order.  There is therefore no legal obligation placed on Councils to fly the Union Flag on specified days and it is at the discretion of each Council as to when and whether or not to fly the Union Flag. 
     
  • A judicial review was conducted in 2001 of a decision by the Secretary of State to introduce the Flags Regulations.  In that judgement, it was ruled that the Regulations did not conflict with the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement.  The judge stated that:
    “The Union flag is the flag of the United Kingdom of which Northern Ireland is a part. It is the judgment of the Secretary of State that it should be flown on government buildings only on those days on which it is flown in Great Britain. By thus confining the days on which the flag is to appear, the Secretary of State sought to strike the correct balance between, on the one hand, acknowledging Northern Ireland’s constitutional position, and, on the other, not giving offence to those who oppose it. That approach seems to me to exemplify a proper regard for “partnership, equality and mutual respect” and to fulfil the Government’s undertaking that its jurisdiction in Northern Ireland “shall be exercised with rigorous impartiality on behalf of all the people in the diversity of their identities and traditions “. I do not consider, therefore, that the Regulations have been shown to be in conflict with the Belfast Agreement.” 
     
  • The Equality Commission advice note on “Advice on Flying the Union Flag in Councils”  states that:
    “It is for each local Council to determine their own policies on the display of the Union Flag, taking account of the full context in which they operate.”
    In the advice note the Commission is of the view that the flying of the Union Flag must be viewed within the context in which it is flown or displayed and factors affecting this context include “the purpose, manner, location and frequency within which flags are flown”.  They are also of the view that, “while it is appropriate for a local Council to fly the Union Flag at its Civic Headquarters, the rationale for its display at every Council location, facility and leisure centre would be questionable.”
    The Commission also stated in the advice note that the final Council policy should reflect the Council’s legitimate policy aims and “not cause unlawful discrimination or harassment, unintentionally or indirectly through its likely effects or impacts.”
     
  • Groups Affected by the Proposed Policy.  The Council Civic Headquarters in Coleraine and the three Council Offices in Ballymoney, Limavady and Ballycastle provide a range of direct services to the public. They also facilitate Civic and Mayoral receptions, meetings of Council and its Committees, Sub Committees, Working Groups, etc., internal meetings of staff as well as meetings of staff and Councillors with external organisations, groups and individuals.
    Users of the Council Civic Headquarters and the three other Council Office buildings are identified as:
    • Councillors 
    • Council employees and other contracted staff
    • Members of the public
    • Suppliers and contractors.
    Visitors to the Civic Headquarters and the three other Council Office buildings are not monitored in terms of their community background, religious belief, etc.
     
  • Consideration also needs to be given to the role of the Council as an employer. Council in its “Equal Opportunities Policy”, in line with the Fair Employment Code of Practice, is committed to:
    “Promoting a good and harmonious working environment where all men and women are treated with respect and dignity and in which no form of intimidation or harassment will be tolerated.”
     
  • Council within its “Dignity and Respect at Work Policy”  also commits itself to the promotion of equality of opportunity and good relations and defines harassment, inter alia, as:
    “visual displays of posters, graffiti, obscene gestures, flags, bunting or emblems or any other offensive material.”
    The key issue here then is whether flying the Union flag could constitute conduct which could result in allegations of harassment for employees from a Catholic and/or Nationalist background.

     
  • Good Relations Issues - Under Section 75(2) of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, the Council has a duty to have regard to the desirability of promoting good relations between persons of different religious beliefs, political opinion or racial group.  The Councils Good Relations Section carried out an Audit in 2018 which consulted with stakeholders through public meetings, an online survey, a street survey, one-to-one interviews, focus groups and telephone interviews.  The findings informed their current Good Relations Strategy 2018-2023.  The online survey under the theme ‘Our shared community’ where all areas are open and accessible to everyone demonstrated:
    Respondents felt that CCGBC is welcoming to people of:
    • different religions - 50.26% yes; 5.64% no; and 31.79% sometimes
    • different racial backgrounds – 49.23% yes; 5.13% no; and 27.18% sometimes
    • different political opinions – 43.59% yes; 9.74% no and 34.36% sometimes
    • 78.85% are favourable towards someone from a Catholic community background; 
    • 75.9% are favourable towards someone from a Protestant community background
    • 71.8% are favourable towards someone from a different ethnic group
    • 11.98% think sectarianism is a major problem, while 38.3% is a minor problem and 40.12% think it is no problem
    • 7.19% think racism is a major problem, while 30.54% is a minor problem and 46.11% think it is no problem.
Section 75 Category 

Details of Evidence/Information

  • Mid-year 2020 NISRA statistics detailed the usual resident population of Causeway Coast & Glens Local Government District to be 144,900, accounting for 7.6% of the N.I. total.  Statistical information with regards to the Districts makeup and individuals therein was also reviewed. 
     
  • It was agreed on 12 February 2015, that existing Legacy Council flag flying arrangements would roll over into the new Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council.  Existing arrangements in Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council shows an inconsistent approach:
    Ballymoney Area - The Union Flag is flown on designated days and days designated by Her Majesty the Queen. Discretion by the Mayor and Chief Executive to fly on additional days, for example death of prominent Politicians.
    Policy applies to three Council buildings:
    Riada House, Joey Dunlop Leisure Centre and the Town Hall. 
    Coleraine area - The Union Flag was flown 365 days per annum at Coleraine Town Hall, two weeks in July at Portrush Town Hall and during business hours at Cloonavin. 
    Limavady area - No Flags are flown. (apart from the Blue Seaside Award flag.)
    Moyle area – No flags (apart from the Blue Seaside Award flag.)
  • This was followed by a Notice of Motion submitted to a meeting of Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council on 28th April 2015.  In accordance with Council policy, this Notice of Motion was referred to Council’s Corporate Policy and Resources Committee meeting on 19th May 2015 and later on 16th June 2015.
    The following Notice of Motion was proposed, at the meeting on 16th June 2015:
    ​“That this Council supports the following policy with regard to the flying of the Union flag in Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council Area. Civic Centres and former Centres of local Government (Coleraine Town Hall, Ballymoney Town Hall, Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre - formerly Limavady Town Hall, Portrush Town Hall and Portstewart Town Hall) - 365 Days. Council Admin HQ (Cloonavin) - Working Days and Designated Days plus, including other days at the discretion of the Chief Executive. Council Admin Centres (Riada House, Limavady Council Offices and Sheskburn House) - Working Days and Designated Days plus, including any other days at the discretion of the Chief Executive.”
    The Corporate Policy and Resources Committee on 16th June 2015 recommended to Council that the motion be adopted as Council policy subject to the requirements of Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998.
    The minutes of the meeting on 16th June 2015 were submitted for ratification (on 28th July 2015 ) and were subsequently adopted by Council.  However following a tender for an EQIA it did not progress, until the present motion was proposed on 4th May 2021 and following a call-in was adopted by Council on 5 October 2021.

     
  • Since the establishment of the new Council on 1st April 2015 no formal complaints have been received regarding the display of the Union flag within Council owned and operated buildings and grounds.  However the absence of complaints may only present part of the picture.
     
  • Rural and urban citizens will be treated in the same way regarding the proposals. 
     
  • It is also clear that the majority of our borough is rural in composition and therefore the specific needs of those individuals must to be considered during screening.   
     
  • Consultation by the Northern Ireland Assembly Commission EQIA Review of the Policy on the Flying of the Union Flag at Parliament Buildings.
     
  • The Equality Commission for Northern Ireland, “An Evidence Base for Shaping Welcoming and Inclusive Workplaces” Literature Review, April 2019 . 
     
  • In addition the Equality Commission has issued guidance on promoting a good and harmonious working environment which states that: 
    “A good and harmonious working environment is one where all workers are treated with dignity and respect and where no worker is subjected to harassment by conduct that is related to religious belief or political opinion….This of course does not mean that working environments must always be devoid of anything that happens to be more closely associated with one or other of the two main communities in Northern Ireland….In other words an ‘harmonious’ working environment does not necessarily mean a ‘neutral’ one.”  
    The guidance includes the following advice on the issue of workplace emblems: 
    “…the Commission recommends that where an employer is seeking to provide or maintain fair participation, or to ensure that all services and facilities are widely utilised by all sections of the community, there is sensitivity concerning displays wholly or mainly associated with one section of the community.”
    The guidance also includes the following advice specifically on the flying of the Union flag:
    “The flying of the Union Flag must be viewed within the context in which it is flown or displayed.  Factors affecting the context include the manner, location and frequency with which flags are flown.  The Union Flag is the national flag of the United Kingdom and, arising therefrom, has a particular status symbolising the constitutional position of Northern Ireland.  On the other hand, the Union Flag is often used to mark sectional community allegiance.  There is a world of difference between these two approaches. Thus, for example, while it is acceptable and appropriate, in the Commission’s view, for a local Council to fly the Union Flag at its Civic Headquarters, the rationale for its display at every Council location, facility and leisure centre would be questionable.”  
     
  • As a result of the above advice the selection of certain Council locations and not others may or may not potentially create a ‘chill factor’ in areas as a result of flying or not flying the Union flag.
     
  • The Fair Employment Code of Practice  also provides general guidance to employers with regard to good practice in the promotion of equality of opportunity.  In relation to the working environment the code states that employers should:
    “Promote a good and harmonious working environment and atmosphere in which no worker feels under threat or intimidated because of his religious belief or political opinion e.g. prohibit the display of flags, emblems, posters, graffiti, or the circulation of materials, or the deliberate articulation of songs, which are likely to give offence or cause apprehension among particular groups of employees.”
Religious Beliefs 

The 2011 Census outlined:

Census 2011  CC&G Borough Council  Northern Ireland
Roman Catholic 36.97%  40.76%
Protestant & Other Christian (including Christian related)  48.44%  41.56%
Other Religions  0.59%  0.82%
None/Not stated  5.64%  6.75%

 

 

Staff breakdown by Religious Belief / Community Background            
                                                              (Figures as at 21 October 2021)
Religious Belief / Community Background  Gender  Number of Staff  Percentage
Roman Catholic  Male   123 19.52%
Female  122  19.37%
Protestant  Male  218  34.60%
Female  131  20.79%
Non-Determined  Male  17  2.70%
Female  19  3.02%
Total   630 100%

 

 

Building  Area
Coleraine Town Hall  Coleraine
Cloonavin Council Headquarters  Coleraine
Limavady Office (Connell St)  Limavady
Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre  Limavady
Ballymoney Town Hall  Ballymoney
Riada House  Ballymoney
Portrush Town Hall  Portrush
Portstewart Town Hall  Portstewart

 

2011 - Religion or religion brought up in
SETT2015
2011 Census
All usual residents  Catholic  Protestant
& Other Christian
(including Christian related) 
Other religions None
Northern Ireland  1810863  817385  875717  16592  101169
Ballycastle 5237 4039 997 33 168
Ballymoney  10402  1786  7929  82  605
Coleraine  24634  5935  16770  287  1642
Limavady  12032  5343  6236  44  409
Portrush  6454  1603  4318  49  484
Portstewart  8003  2844  4560  83  516



  

NI LIFE & TIMES SURVEY 2020 
Opinions on flying the Union Flag   
by Religion
                                    %                  
  Catholic  Protestant  No religion
Union flag flown from all public buildings all the time  38  13
Union flag flown on designated days only  35  51  53
Union flag not flown at all from any public building  54  25
Don't know  8


In terms of religion or religion brought up in the 2011 Census and current staff stats as detailed above indicate that our resident’s and staff’s religious beliefs can be seen to have 2 predominant groupings ie Roman Catholic and Protestant.  However we also have a number of individuals (Census 5.64% and Staff 5.72%) who either do not practice a specific religion or who do not wish to be grouped into a specific religion.  In addition we have a small number of individuals (Census) who practice other religions.

The notice of motion referred to set buildings and the religious breakdown for those specific areas is also of key importance, however due to the fact; that small numbers in some areas my allow identification these figures have not been detailed here.  In addition the 2020 NI Life and Times Survey suggests there is a large group of individuals who support flying the flag on designated days.  However the research does not drill down to identify views by local council areas.  In relation to staff, the 2020 NI Life and Times Survey identified that 89% of people preferred a mixed religion workplace.

The call-in highlighted the contentious nature regarding the decision to fly the Union flag.  However it is also noted that there have been no complaints received from users or staff in this regard since 2015 when Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council was formed.  This includes the venues where the Union flag currently flies 365 days per year and where it is not flown at all.

The consultation by the Northern Ireland Assembly Commission EQIA Review of the Policy on the Flying of the Union Flag at Parliament Buildings noted “people from the Nationalist community might experience a ‘chill factor’ in their dealings with the Council as a result of the flying of the Union flag”.

Therefore a consultation process with relevant parties will inform the policy formation, support the identification of potential mitigation measures and identify any disproportionate adverse impacts with regards to religion.
Political Opinion

The Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey (2020) provides the following information on the political parties people in Northern Ireland feel closest to (this information is not available at Council area level) *:

Party %            
DUP/Democratic Unionist Party  23
Sinn Féin  11
Ulster Unionist Party (UUP)  11
Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP)  14
Alliance Party  28
Green Party    4
Other Party    2
None of these    3
Don't know    3


The flying of the union flag can be seen to closely relate to political opinion from the discussions in the chamber by elected representatives.  The call-in highlighted the contentious nature regarding the decision to fly the Union flag.  

However it is also noted that there have been no complaints received from users or staff in this regard since 2015 when Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council was formed.  This includes the venues where the Union flag currently flies 365 days per year and where it is not flown at all.

The different approaches taken by the legacy Councils prior to the amalgamation may denote varied viewpoints and support to fly the Union flag across the new Council area which will not only relate to the current motion, but also the choice of future venues.  In addition the Equality Commission in their Corporate Plan 2019-2022  stated that prejudicial behaviours remain “Prejudicial attitudes toward those of different religious beliefs is present in Northern Ireland, particularly sectarianism” in the workplace in Northern Ireland and this must be viewed alongside the rise in both sectarian incidents (70 cases) and crime (49 cases) over the year July 2020 to June 2021.  However the impact of a change regarding the flying of the union flag is unknown and may or may not be relevant.

The consultation by the Northern Ireland Assembly Commission EQIA Review of the Policy on the Flying of the Union Flag at Parliament Buildings noted “people from the Nationalist community might experience a ‘chill factor’ in their dealings with the Council as a result of the flying of the Union flag”.

Therefore a consultation process with relevant parties will inform the policy formation, support the identification of potential mitigation measures and identify any disproportionate adverse impacts with regards to political opinion.

Racial Group

On Census Day 27th March 2011 the resident population was:

  N.I. (%) Rest of U.K. (%)  ROI (%)   Other Europe (%)  Rest of World (%)
N.I.  88.84 4.56  2.09  2.51  1.99
Causeway Coast & Glens Local Government District  91.02  4.99  1.42  1.45  1.06

 

Staff breakdown by Racial Group / Ethnic Origin                
                                                                  (Figures as at 21 October 2021)
Racial Group / Ethnic Origin Gender  Number of Staff  Percentage
Mixed Ethnic Group  Male  -
Female  0.16%
Other  Male  0.16%
Female  0.16%
White / White European  Male  325  51.59%
Female  237  37.62%
Unknown  Male  32  5.08%
Female  33  5.23%
Total   630 100%

 

Again there have been no complaints received from users or staff on the basis of race with regard to flying the Union flag.  

Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence that this relates to their racial grouping.

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.

Age 

Age: (Mid Year 2020)*   (NISRA statistics)

  CC&G Borough Council  Northern Ireland
Under 15  28,600 (19.74%)  395,800 (20.88%)
16-64  89,200 (61.56%)  1,179,700 (62.24%)
65-84  23900 (16.49%)  280,600 (14.80%)
85 and over  3200 (2.21%)  39,400 (2.08%)
TOTAL Population 144,900  1,895,500


 

Staff breakdown by Age     

                                                                  (Figures as at 21 October 2021)

Age Group Number of staff  Percentage
22-29  17  2.70%
30-34  33  5.24%
35-39  64  10.16%
40-44  81  12.86%
45-49  111  17.62%
50-54  112  17.78%
55-59  99  15.71%
60-64  84  13.33%
65-120  29  4.60%
Total 630 100%
     
     

 

NI Life & Times Survey 2020 
Opinions on flying the Union flag by Age                               %                    
  18-24  25-34  35-44  45-54  55-64  65+
Union flag flown from all public buildings all the time  17  22  18  19  24  21
Union flag flown on designated days only  25  36  42  49  52  62
Union flag not flown at all from any public building  37  29  32  26  16  12
Don't know  22  14  5

                                           
The 2020 NI Life and Times Survey suggests there is no major variance related to age.  

Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence that this relates to their age. 

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.

Marital Status

Marital Status: 
Marital status by former legacy Council area (most recent figures available from Census 2011):

Census 2011  Ballymoney BC  Coleraine BC  Limavady BC  Moyle DC
Single  32.68%  34.78%  36.64%  34.96%
Married  52.52%  48.88%  48.94%  49.03%
Civil Partnership  0.07%  0.06%  0.08%  0.08%
Separated  3.13%    3.15% 3.58% 3.66%
Divorced/
Civil
Partnership Dissolved 
5.23%  6.13%  4.99%  5.11%
Widowed/
Surviving
Civil Partner 
6.39%   7.00%  5.78% 7.15%

 

Staff breakdown by Marital Status                                                                           
                                                         (Figures as at 21 October 2021)
Marital Status Number of staff  Percentage
Divorced  13  2.06%
Married \ Civil Partnership  346  54.92%
Other  20  3.17%
Separated  12  1.91%
Single  170  26.98%
Widowed  0.32%
Unknown  67  10.64%
Total 630 100%

Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence that this relates to their marital status. 

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.

Sexual Orientation

There are no specific figures available on how many people may be Gay, Lesbian, Bi-sexual or Trans-gender or Trans-sexual (LGBT) specific to the Council area. 

The Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey (2020)*   provides the following information on the sexual orientation of people in Northern Ireland (this information is not available at local government level):

  %
I am ‘gay’ or ‘lesbian’ (homosexual)    3
 I am heterosexual or ‘straight’  94
 I am bi-sexual    2
Other    1

In addition the NI Rainbow Project estimates between 6-10% of any given population could be considered as LGBT. 

Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence that this relates to their sexual orientation. 

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.

Men and Women Generally 

Gender:  (Mid Year 2020 Population Estimates)* 

  CC&G Borough Council  Northern Ireland
Male 71,839 (49.6%)  934,155 (49.3%)
Female 73,104 (50.4%)  961,355 (50.7%)

 

Staff breakdown by Gender
                                                         (Figures as at 21 October 2021)
Gender Number of staff  Percentage
Male  358  56.83%
Female  272  43.17%
Total 630 100%


Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence that this relates to their gender. 

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.

Dependants 

The Census information in 2011 showed:
People With or Without Dependents:

Census 2011 CC&G Borough Council  Northern Ireland 
Number of households  54,970  721,860
Households with dependent children  15,597 (28.37%)  261,251 (36.19%)

Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence that this relates to whether they have or do not have dependents. 

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.
Disability

People with a Disability/People Without:
People with a long term condition/illness by former legacy Council area (most recent figures available from Census 2011):

 

Census 2011 Ballymoney BC Coleraine BC Limavady BC Moyle DC
People with a long term condition/illness  30.6%  31.31%  31.05%  31.68%
People Without  69.4%  68.69%  68.95%  68.32%

 ____                                                              

Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council Long Term Condition:
Mobility or dexterity  19%
Long term pain or discomfort  17%
Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing  14%
A chronic illness  11%
Deafness or partial hearing loss  9%
An emotional, psychological or mental health condition  9%
Other condition  9%
A learning, intellectual or social behaviour difficulty  3%
Frequent periods of confusion or memory loss  3%
Blindness or partial sight  3%
Communication difficulty  3%


Source: NINIS, Census 2011, KS302NI
Notes: 

1. ‘Communication difficulty’ means a difficulty with speaking or making yourself understood. 
2. ‘A mobility or dexterity difficulty’ means a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, lifting or carrying. 
3. ‘An emotional, psychological or mental health condition’ includes conditions such as depression or schizophrenia. 
4. ‘Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing’ includes conditions such as asthma. 
5. ‘A chronic illness’ includes illnesses such as cancer, HIV, diabetes, heart disease or epilepsy. 
6. ‘Long-term’ refers to a condition which has lasted, or is expected to last, at least 12 months.

 

Staff breakdown by Disability
                                                         (Figures as at 21 October 2021)
With or Without a Disability Number of staff  Percentage
With  14  2.22%
Without  616  97.78%
Total 630 100%

Individuals may have a personal preference regarding the flying of the Union Flag, however there is no evidence this relates to if they have a disability or not. 

A consultation process will support the identification of any currently unknown impacts.

 

Please click on the links below for access to further sections of the screening process.