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New quad tracker scheme aims to shut the gate on rural crime

New quad tracker scheme aims to shut the gate on rural crime

Wed, February 12, 2020

Causeway Coast and Glens Policing and Community Safety Partnership and the PSNI have launched a new pilot scheme which aims to deter quad thefts and help recover stolen machinery.

The initiative provides quad owners with funding assistance to install tracking devices which can act as an important crime deterrent.

Speaking about the scheme, PCSP Chairperson Alderman George Duddy said: “Tackling rural crime is very much a joint effort and Causeway Coast and Glens Policing and Community Safety Partnership recognise that it’s important we continue to strengthen our relationships with partners to ensure we are all doing everything we can to prevent rural crime. Through the scheme we aim to support our rural neighbours to protect themselves and their livelihoods from quad theft.”

Neighbourhood Sergeant Tim McCullough added: “Quads are an expensive commodity therefore we would urge owners to take all possible steps to protect such items. Theft can have a real detrimental impact on your business or farm and so spending a bit of time reviewing your security will go a long way to helping reduce your chance of becoming a victim of crime.

“If your quad is stolen then you will want to ensure you have the best chance of getting it back and catching those responsible for rural crime. Tracker technology can help us recover valuable vehicles like quads and we would encourage owners to take advantage of this opportunity through the PCSP.”

If you are a quad owner and are interested in being considered to take part in the pilot scheme you can request an expression of interest form by emailing: pcsp@causewaycoastandglens.gov.uk or by calling 028 207 62225.

The closing date for return of expression of interest forms is Monday 2nd March 2020. Please note that the availability of tracker devices is limited and applications will be marked against a set criteria including crime pattern analysis via the PSNI.